SOWING THE SEEDS OF POP

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POP. Yes that’s right just another popular culture corn sown, harvested, popped and finally ingested by society. This blog it’s self has not only demonstrated but contributed to the latest trend of technological online popular culture power; BLOGGING.  Make sure you wash it down with some superficial looking shake.

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MEADHAM KIRCHHOFF

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Meadham Kirchhoff Autumn/Winter 2012

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The Meadham Kirchoff A/W12 collecion draws inspiration from Taboo, the early 80’s club in London populated by various pop cult stars including Boy George, performance artist Leigh Bowery, designer John Galliano and milliner Stephen Jones. Meadham Kirchhoff were firm favourites of Taboo, a place that celebrated individualism: there were no rules, apparently, apart from the one to dress up to the nines. London as a fashion city might have grown up, but the duo are still intent on injecting a shot of undiluted creativity to fashion week. Like that of Jeremy Scott the design pair take influence from popular cult classic cartoon characters such as Micky Mouse drawing ideas from popular culture and re-approprating into new formats.

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ELIZABETH PRICE – TURNER PRIZE WINNER 2012

TURNER PRIZE WINNER 2012 – ELIZABETH PRICE – THE WOOLWORTH CHOIR

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Recently I visited the Turner Prize exhibition at the Tate Britain where I was able to discover Artist Elizabeth Price. Her work for the exhibition contains elements of pop culture. The film she created for the exhibition was comprised of three different sections, the first part demonstrating the architectural qualities of a choir stand in a cathedral. The second part (the popular culture part) is a re-mastered version of an 80’s song sung by a choir. It was this haunting yet energetic track playing which set the backdrop of the third section of the film. This section also featured a pop culture aspect – the music continued to play as the film concluded with a reconstruction of the woolworth fire in Manchester 1979 whilst detailing the architectural qualities of woolworths in juxtaposition and similar style to part 1 of the film. The combination of these elements especially in that the pop music was playing created a eerie tone in my opinion and it was this which then lead me to researching more into the artists ideas..I wondered whether without the pop culture aspect whether this piece would perhaps appear a little lack-lustre. Upon saying that the artist raises awareness and was undoubtably my favourite piece in the Turner Prize Collection.

i-D GYARU DOLLS: THE REAL LIFE BARBIE

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Famous for their impossibly wide blinking eyes, perfect delicate pouts and exaggerated hour glass figures, Gyaru girls are Barbie dolls brought to life. (Minaj would be jealous)

Taking beauty to the next level, Gyaru girls invest their all in looking unbelievably good. Manipulating every feature and proportion to bring them as close to their ideal of perfect as possible, this Japanese craze dictates that girls wear their makeup in an iconic fashion.

Gyaru girls demonstrate a key element of popular culture through the medium of personal style. There is also another important element to this which is key. This style is a ‘CRAZE’. Popular culture would be nothing if it weren’t for the masses peddling trends. It was only when thinking of iconic Japanese harajuku girls that the Gyaru girls made me remember that popular culture is much like fashion, in that, it is a cyclic process, ever reviving and re-incarnating it’s self in the modern world.

FIRST LOOK: AFTER/HOURS/DROP/BOX

The curator of the group exhibition examining the nature of music video in contemporary art picks his top five pieces

Exploring the much-loved format of music videos, from simple documentation of live performances to more narrative approaches, AFTER/HOURS/DROP/BOX is a group art show curated by artist John Lawrence at ANDOR that considers the current significance of the medium in contemporary art, having spanned such a transitionary period in technology. Featuring the seminal work of video artists like George Barber, Michael Bell-Smith, David Blandy, Paul B Davis, and The Duvet Brothers – the exhibition delves into the consistently experimental genre of music video from the view of the artist as both an active influencer and consumer of the pop medium.